Wild Parsnip Can Cause Painful Reaction In Horses, But Not For Common Reason

Researchers have recently discovered that wild parsnip can cause trouble for horses—even if they don’t ingest it. Drs. Bryan Stegelmeier, Steven Colegate, Edward Knoppel, Kerry Rood and Mark Collett have found that the invasive weed, which is a member of the carrot family that can be found throughout the United States, can cause phototoxic reactions in horses, even if they don’t eat it.

Photosensitive skin reactions often occur after a horse eats a plant with photodynamic compounds. These compounds can then found in the horse’s skin and blood; when ultraviolet rays from sunlight strike a horse’s pink skin, painful burns and blisters can occur.

The research team discovered that horses don’t need to eat wild parsnip to have phototoxic reactions—they simply have to come in contact with the plant’s sap. The sap contains furanocoumarins, which have been known to cause intense skin reactions in humans who come in contact with it on sunny days. The areas of the skin exposed to the sap may be sensitive to sunlight for up to two years after the original contact.

Read more at EQUUS magazine.

The post Wild Parsnip Can Cause Painful Reaction In Horses, But Not For Common Reason appeared first on Horse Racing News | Paulick Report.

DYFD Winter - 300x90

Comments are closed.